A Biography of Mathematician Michael Lacey

Michael Thoreau Lacey is a pure mathematician specializing in Harmonic Analysis and Probability at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Since joining the institution in 1996, Lacey has received numerous awards resulting from his outstanding contributions in pure mathematics. Besides, he has mentored and doctored various students who are currently playing significant roles in their academic and industrial jobs.

 

 

 

Academic Background

 

 

 

The American mathematician was born on 26th September 1959. In 1981, he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from the University of Texas. He proceeded to the University of Illinois, Urbana, for a Ph.D. in Mathematics course. Michael Lacey earned his doctorate in 1987 after writing a thesis on Banach Spaces under the supervision of Walter Philipp.

 

 

 

Indeed, Lacey was fascinated by the area of Probability as he concentrated on the field in his research and teaching career. His thesis addressed the area of empirical characteristic functions, with a focus on the law of iterated logarithm.

 

 

 

Postgraduate Career

 

 

 

After completing his doctoral course, Lacey assumed positions at the Louisiana State University. He then proceeded to the University of North Carolina, Hill Chapel, where he jointly proved the central limit theorem with Walter Philipp.

 

 

 

He then assumed teaching roles at Indiana University. At Indiana (1989 to 1996), he received the National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. His interest in Hilbert Transform grew while at Indiana, and he began to study Alberto Conjecture. Later on, he solved the conjecture together with Christoph Thiele.

 

 

 

Professor of Mathematics at Georgia Institute of Technology

 

 

 

Michael Lacey began his teaching career at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1996 and was awarded full professorship in 2001. In his previous institutions, he had been acting as an Associate Professor of Mathematics. In his capacity as a Full Professor of Mathematics, Lacey has participated in numerous research and mathematical seminars. He has doctored over 10 Ph.D. students. He received the Salem Prize together with Christoph Thiele for their role in solving the Alberto Calderon conjecture. In addition, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship ward jointly with Xiaochun Li in 2004. He has also been recognized by the prestigious Simons Foundation for his role in Pure Mathematics.

 

 

 

The role of Lacey doesn’t stop in teaching. He has directed training grants for undergraduate students. Such grants include the MCTP and VIGRE awards. Apart from his position at Georgia Institute of technology, Lacey is currently a fellow of the American Mathematical Society, which he joined in 2012.

 

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